Biotechnology and Health Sciences Biotechnology and Health Sciences Biotech Health Sci http://www.Biotech-health.com 2383-0271 2383-028X 10.5812/bhs en jalali 2017 5 27 gregorian 2017 5 27 3 4
en 10.17795/bhs-37479 Mental Disorders Diagnosed by Psychiatrist’s Clinical Interviews and Results of the Thematic Apperception Test Conducted by Psychologists Mental Disorders Diagnosed by Psychiatrist’s Clinical Interviews and Results of the Thematic Apperception Test Conducted by Psychologists research-article research-article Conclusions

The findings showed a relative concordance between psychiatric interviews and psychological assessments in the clinical diagnosis of mental illness.

Background

One of the most important issues to diagnose mental disorders is the use of independent tools with similar results. Documented history is an important tool to diagnose diseases at each stage. The first and fundamental step in diagnosis is a comprehensive clinical interview.

Objectives

The current study aimed to investigate the concordance of mental disorders diagnosed by psychiatrist’s clinical interviews and results of thematic apperception test (TAT) conducted by psychologists.

Methods

It was a cross sectional descriptive-analytical study. The study population included the patients (male and female) admitted in psychiatry section of Dr. Fatemi hospital in Ardabil, Iran, during 2009-2010. Data were collected from the archive of Ardebil Dr. Fatemi hospital and about 1200 patients were studied. Demographic data of participants including age, gender, marital status, admission date, discharge date and type of insurance were gathered from the recorded documents. The initial diagnosis of psychologist using TAT test was compared with the final diagnosis recorded for the patient attended by physicians. Data were analyzed using SPSS software, ver. 16.

Results

Out of 1,200 participants, 660 (55%) were male and 540 (45%) female; 150 (12.5%) subjects were under 25 years old and 284 (23.66%) were over 45 years old. Also, 650 subjects were illiterate and the rest were literate. The results of Chi-square test showed a significant difference between diagnoses of psychiatrist's clinical interviews with TAT results conducted by psychologists (P < 0.045). In spite of this difference, the results of TAT test were in relative concordance with psychiatrists' diagnoses for schizophrenia, depression, bipolar depression and anxiety disease.

Conclusions

The findings showed a relative concordance between psychiatric interviews and psychological assessments in the clinical diagnosis of mental illness.

Background

One of the most important issues to diagnose mental disorders is the use of independent tools with similar results. Documented history is an important tool to diagnose diseases at each stage. The first and fundamental step in diagnosis is a comprehensive clinical interview.

Objectives

The current study aimed to investigate the concordance of mental disorders diagnosed by psychiatrist’s clinical interviews and results of thematic apperception test (TAT) conducted by psychologists.

Methods

It was a cross sectional descriptive-analytical study. The study population included the patients (male and female) admitted in psychiatry section of Dr. Fatemi hospital in Ardabil, Iran, during 2009-2010. Data were collected from the archive of Ardebil Dr. Fatemi hospital and about 1200 patients were studied. Demographic data of participants including age, gender, marital status, admission date, discharge date and type of insurance were gathered from the recorded documents. The initial diagnosis of psychologist using TAT test was compared with the final diagnosis recorded for the patient attended by physicians. Data were analyzed using SPSS software, ver. 16.

Results

Out of 1,200 participants, 660 (55%) were male and 540 (45%) female; 150 (12.5%) subjects were under 25 years old and 284 (23.66%) were over 45 years old. Also, 650 subjects were illiterate and the rest were literate. The results of Chi-square test showed a significant difference between diagnoses of psychiatrist's clinical interviews with TAT results conducted by psychologists (P < 0.045). In spite of this difference, the results of TAT test were in relative concordance with psychiatrists' diagnoses for schizophrenia, depression, bipolar depression and anxiety disease.

Mental Disorders;Psychological Interview;Thematic Apperception Test Mental Disorders;Psychological Interview;Thematic Apperception Test http://www.Biotech-health.com/index.php?page=article&article_id=37479 Bita Shahbazzadegan Bita Shahbazzadegan Department of Nursing, School of Medicine, Ardabil University of Medical Sciences, Ardabil, IR Iran; Department of Health Education and Health Promotion, School of Health, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran Department of Nursing, School of Medicine, Ardabil University of Medical Sciences, Ardabil, IR Iran; Department of Health Education and Health Promotion, School of Health, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran Mehdi Samadzadeh Mehdi Samadzadeh Ardabil University of Medical Sciences, Ardabil, IR Iran; Ardabil University of Medical Sciences, Ardabil, IR Iran. Tel: +98-4533512000, Fax: +98-4533510057 Ardabil University of Medical Sciences, Ardabil, IR Iran; Ardabil University of Medical Sciences, Ardabil, IR Iran. Tel: +98-4533512000, Fax: +98-4533510057 Moslem Abbasi Moslem Abbasi Department of Psychology, Faculty of Literature and Human Sciences, Salman Farsi University of Kazerun, Kazerun, IR Iran Department of Psychology, Faculty of Literature and Human Sciences, Salman Farsi University of Kazerun, Kazerun, IR Iran
en 10.17795/bhs-38050 Evaluation of Patient-Oriented Standards of Joint Commission International in Gilan and Mazandaran Teaching Hospitals Evaluation of Patient-Oriented Standards of Joint Commission International in Gilan and Mazandaran Teaching Hospitals research-article research-article Conclusions

According to the results, it seems that more planning and implementation of projects is required to strengthen the axes of the joint commission regarding accreditation of hospitals and attraction of medical tourists to these centers, especially foreign tourists. Researchers are recommended to pay special attention to the university of medical sciences of two provinces for the establishment of standards and utilization of professional consultants.

Background

Medical tourism, a multi-million-dollar industry, has had a significant effect in economic flourishing, creating jobs, and preventing the outflow of currency.

Objectives

The aim of this study was to evaluate teaching hospitals affiliated to Gilan and Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences, according to joint commission international (JCI) standards.

Methods

This was a descriptive cross sectional study conducted among teaching hospitals affiliated to Gilan and Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences during year 2015. To collect data and evaluate the hospitals, patient-oriented standards of JCI was applied.

Results

Amongst the eight standards, international patient safety goals (IPSG) (with a score of 87.5%) had the highest, and patient and family education (PFE) (with a score of 53.75%) had the lowest score. Hospital “4” with a score of 90.41%, had the highest, and hospital “7” with 58.90%, had the lowest rate of compliance to the standards. According to the Mann-Whitney test, the observed statistics considering a P value of ≤ 0.05 level, was not significant, therefore on a 95% certainty level, there was no significant difference between hospitals in Gilan and Mazandaran, regarding compliance with standards. Overall, the hospitals under study were relatively prepared for attracting medical tourists.

Conclusions

According to the results, it seems that more planning and implementation of projects is required to strengthen the axes of the joint commission regarding accreditation of hospitals and attraction of medical tourists to these centers, especially foreign tourists. Researchers are recommended to pay special attention to the university of medical sciences of two provinces for the establishment of standards and utilization of professional consultants.

Background

Medical tourism, a multi-million-dollar industry, has had a significant effect in economic flourishing, creating jobs, and preventing the outflow of currency.

Objectives

The aim of this study was to evaluate teaching hospitals affiliated to Gilan and Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences, according to joint commission international (JCI) standards.

Methods

This was a descriptive cross sectional study conducted among teaching hospitals affiliated to Gilan and Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences during year 2015. To collect data and evaluate the hospitals, patient-oriented standards of JCI was applied.

Results

Amongst the eight standards, international patient safety goals (IPSG) (with a score of 87.5%) had the highest, and patient and family education (PFE) (with a score of 53.75%) had the lowest score. Hospital “4” with a score of 90.41%, had the highest, and hospital “7” with 58.90%, had the lowest rate of compliance to the standards. According to the Mann-Whitney test, the observed statistics considering a P value of ≤ 0.05 level, was not significant, therefore on a 95% certainty level, there was no significant difference between hospitals in Gilan and Mazandaran, regarding compliance with standards. Overall, the hospitals under study were relatively prepared for attracting medical tourists.

Medical Tourism;Patient-Oriented Standards;JCI;Gilan, Mazandaran, Hospital Medical Tourism;Patient-Oriented Standards;JCI;Gilan, Mazandaran, Hospital http://www.Biotech-health.com/index.php?page=article&article_id=38050 Salman Ghaseminejhad Salman Ghaseminejhad Health Services Management, Sari Branch, Islamic Azad University, Sari, IR Iran Health Services Management, Sari Branch, Islamic Azad University, Sari, IR Iran Ghahraman Mahmoudi Ghahraman Mahmoudi Department of Health Services Management, Sari Branch, Islamic Azad University, Sari, IR Iran; Department of Health Services Management, Sari Branch, Islamic Azad University, Sari, IR Iran. Tel: +98-1133176075, Fax: +98-1133032895 Department of Health Services Management, Sari Branch, Islamic Azad University, Sari, IR Iran; Department of Health Services Management, Sari Branch, Islamic Azad University, Sari, IR Iran. Tel: +98-1133176075, Fax: +98-1133032895 Ghasem Abedi Ghasem Abedi Health Sciences Research Center, Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences, Sari, IR Iran Health Sciences Research Center, Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences, Sari, IR Iran
en 10.17795/bhs-38278 Bioinformatics Approach for Pattern of Myelin-Specific Proteins and Related Human Disorders Bioinformatics Approach for Pattern of Myelin-Specific Proteins and Related Human Disorders research-article research-article Conclusions

The growth rate of information in bioinformatics databases could facilitate studies of live organisms prior to observation studies. Two different protein classes could be causative agents of one disease. However, two related diseases from one disease group could consist of different protein classes. Future research in the field of proteomics could allow modern insight to reshuffling of proteins in different diseases, and lead to the discovery of the etiology of such diseases.

Background

Recent neuroinformatic studies, on the structure-function interaction of proteins, causative agents basis of human disease have implied that dysfunction or defect of different protein classes could be associated with several related diseases.

Objectives

The aim of this study was the use of bioinformatics approaches for understanding the structure, function and relationship of myelin protein 2 (PMP2), a myelin-basic protein in the basis of neuronal disorders.

Methods

A collection of databases for exploiting classification information systematically, including, protein structure, protein family and classification of human disease, based on a new approach was used. Knowledge discovery was carried out based on collections criteria and in silico integrative in vitro studies.

Results

The results of the evaluation of bioinformatics comorbid proteomics studies revealed that PMP2, an intracellular and membrane myelin protein, is specific for a neuritis disease and collaborative to other diseases. Leprosy, another neuronal disease that could be related to neuritis, consists of interferon gamma (IFNG), a secreted protein included various protein classes from what is neuritis.

Conclusions

The growth rate of information in bioinformatics databases could facilitate studies of live organisms prior to observation studies. Two different protein classes could be causative agents of one disease. However, two related diseases from one disease group could consist of different protein classes. Future research in the field of proteomics could allow modern insight to reshuffling of proteins in different diseases, and lead to the discovery of the etiology of such diseases.

Background

Recent neuroinformatic studies, on the structure-function interaction of proteins, causative agents basis of human disease have implied that dysfunction or defect of different protein classes could be associated with several related diseases.

Objectives

The aim of this study was the use of bioinformatics approaches for understanding the structure, function and relationship of myelin protein 2 (PMP2), a myelin-basic protein in the basis of neuronal disorders.

Methods

A collection of databases for exploiting classification information systematically, including, protein structure, protein family and classification of human disease, based on a new approach was used. Knowledge discovery was carried out based on collections criteria and in silico integrative in vitro studies.

Results

The results of the evaluation of bioinformatics comorbid proteomics studies revealed that PMP2, an intracellular and membrane myelin protein, is specific for a neuritis disease and collaborative to other diseases. Leprosy, another neuronal disease that could be related to neuritis, consists of interferon gamma (IFNG), a secreted protein included various protein classes from what is neuritis.

Bioinformatics Databases;Myelin Protein 2 (PMP2);Protein Classes;Human Disorders Bioinformatics Databases;Myelin Protein 2 (PMP2);Protein Classes;Human Disorders http://www.Biotech-health.com/index.php?page=article&article_id=38278 Samiie Pouragahi Samiie Pouragahi Department of Molecular Medicine, School of Medicine, Qazvin university of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, IR Iran; Department of Bioinformatics, National Institute of Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology (NIGEB), Tehran, IR Iran; Department of Pharmacology, Cellular and Molecular Research Center, School of Medicine, Qazvin university of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, IR Iran Department of Molecular Medicine, School of Medicine, Qazvin university of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, IR Iran; Department of Bioinformatics, National Institute of Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology (NIGEB), Tehran, IR Iran; Department of Pharmacology, Cellular and Molecular Research Center, School of Medicine, Qazvin university of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, IR Iran Mohammad Hossein Sanati Mohammad Hossein Sanati Department of Molecular Genetics, National Institute of Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology (NIGEB), Tehran, IR Iran Department of Molecular Genetics, National Institute of Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology (NIGEB), Tehran, IR Iran Mehdi Sadeghi Mehdi Sadeghi Department of Bioinformatics, National Institute of Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology (NIGEB), Tehran, IR Iran Department of Bioinformatics, National Institute of Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology (NIGEB), Tehran, IR Iran Marjan Nassiri-Asl Marjan Nassiri-Asl Department of Pharmacology, Cellular and Molecular Research Center, School of Medicine, Qazvin university of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, IR Iran; School of Medicine, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, IR Iran. Tel: +98-2833336001, Fax: +98-2833324971 Department of Pharmacology, Cellular and Molecular Research Center, School of Medicine, Qazvin university of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, IR Iran; School of Medicine, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, IR Iran. Tel: +98-2833336001, Fax: +98-2833324971
en 10.17795/bhs-38629 Performance Analysis of Hospitals Affiliated to Mashhad University of Medical Sciences Using the Pabon Lasso Model: A Six-Year-Trend Study Performance Analysis of Hospitals Affiliated to Mashhad University of Medical Sciences Using the Pabon Lasso Model: A Six-Year-Trend Study research-article research-article Background

Nowadays, productivity and efficiency are considered a culture and a perspective in both life and work environments. This is the starting point of human development.

Objectives

The aim of the present study was to investigate the performance of hospitals affiliated to Mashhad University of Medical Sciences using the Pabon Lasso Model.

Methods

The present study was a descriptive-analytic research, with a cross-sectional design, conducted during six years (2009 - 2014), at selected hospitals. The studied hospitals of this study were 21 public hospitals affiliated to Mashhad University of Medical Sciences. The data was obtained from the treatment Deputy of Khorasan Razavi province.

Conclusions

According to the findings, only a few hospitals are at the desirable zone (zone 3); the rest of the hospitals fell in other zones, which could be a result of poor performance and poor management of hospital resources. Most of the hospitals were in zones 1 and 4, whose characteristics are low bed turnover and longer stay, indicating higher bed supply than demand for healthcare services or longer hospitalization, less outpatient equipment use, and higher costs.

Results

Results from the present study showed that only 19% of the studied hospitals were located in zone 3 of the diagram, indicating a perfect performance. Twenty-eight percent were in zone 1, 19% in zone 2, and 28% in zone 4.

Background

Nowadays, productivity and efficiency are considered a culture and a perspective in both life and work environments. This is the starting point of human development.

Objectives

The aim of the present study was to investigate the performance of hospitals affiliated to Mashhad University of Medical Sciences using the Pabon Lasso Model.

Methods

The present study was a descriptive-analytic research, with a cross-sectional design, conducted during six years (2009 - 2014), at selected hospitals. The studied hospitals of this study were 21 public hospitals affiliated to Mashhad University of Medical Sciences. The data was obtained from the treatment Deputy of Khorasan Razavi province.

Conclusions

According to the findings, only a few hospitals are at the desirable zone (zone 3); the rest of the hospitals fell in other zones, which could be a result of poor performance and poor management of hospital resources. Most of the hospitals were in zones 1 and 4, whose characteristics are low bed turnover and longer stay, indicating higher bed supply than demand for healthcare services or longer hospitalization, less outpatient equipment use, and higher costs.

Results

Results from the present study showed that only 19% of the studied hospitals were located in zone 3 of the diagram, indicating a perfect performance. Twenty-eight percent were in zone 1, 19% in zone 2, and 28% in zone 4.

Hospitals’ Performance Evaluation;Pabon Lasso Model;Efficiency;Key Performance Indicators;Mashhad University of Medical Sciences;Iran Hospitals’ Performance Evaluation;Pabon Lasso Model;Efficiency;Key Performance Indicators;Mashhad University of Medical Sciences;Iran http://www.Biotech-health.com/index.php?page=article&article_id=38629 Rohollah Kalhor Rohollah Kalhor Social Determinants of Health Research Center, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, IR Iran Social Determinants of Health Research Center, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, IR Iran Fatemeh Darzi Ramandi Fatemeh Darzi Ramandi School of Public Health, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, IR Iran School of Public Health, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, IR Iran Sima Rafiei Sima Rafiei Health Services Management Department, School of Public Health, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, IR Iran Health Services Management Department, School of Public Health, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, IR Iran Seyed Saeed Tabatabaee Seyed Saeed Tabatabaee Health Services Management Research Center, Institute for Futures Studies in Health, Kerman University of Medical Sciences, Kerman, IR Iran Health Services Management Research Center, Institute for Futures Studies in Health, Kerman University of Medical Sciences, Kerman, IR Iran Mohammad Azmal Mohammad Azmal Bushehr University of Medical Sciences, Bushehr, IR Iran Bushehr University of Medical Sciences, Bushehr, IR Iran Leila Kalhor Leila Kalhor Student Research Committee, Hormozgan University of Medical Sciences, Bandar Abbas, IR Iran; Student Research Committee, Hormozgan University of Medical Sciences, Bandar Abbas, IR Iran. Tel: +98.763337192, Fax: +98.763337192 Student Research Committee, Hormozgan University of Medical Sciences, Bandar Abbas, IR Iran; Student Research Committee, Hormozgan University of Medical Sciences, Bandar Abbas, IR Iran. Tel: +98.763337192, Fax: +98.763337192
en 10.17795/bhs-38652 The Association Between Sleep Quality and Metabolic Factors and Anthropometric Measurements The Association Between Sleep Quality and Metabolic Factors and Anthropometric Measurements research-article research-article Conclusions

People with a poor sleep quality had a higher BMI, waist circumference and serum triglyceride levels and a lower HDL-c concentration. Furthermore, BMI and serum triglyceride concentration are independently associated with the score of sleep quality. Indeed, it is recommended for people to screen for sleep quality to start necessary interventions.

Background

Several studies have shown that sleep disorders may lead to metabolic or endocrine changes including insulin resistance, diabetes, obesity, cardiovascular disease and stroke.

Objectives

The aim of this study was to investigate the association between sleep quality and metabolic factors and anthropometric measurements among personnel of a central petrochemical company in Tehran.

Methods

This cross-sectional study was conducted on 400 personnel of a central petrochemical company in Tehran, during year 2015. Demographic information including age, gender, educational status, employment duration, working hours per day, marital status, smoking, medical history for disease and drug use, were collected by a questionnaire. Systolic and diastolic blood pressure and also height and weight were measured by standard methods and body mass index (BMI) was calculated. Pittsburg sleep quality index (PSQI) was performed to assess participants’ sleep quality. Serum concentrations of fasting glucose and lipid profiles were measured by the related biochemical kits. Logistic regression analysis was used for multivariate adjusting of factors associated with sleep quality.

Results

The mean score for participants’ Pittsburgh sleep quality index (PSQI) was 4.77 ± 2.62. About 30% of participants had had bad sleep quality. A high body mass index (BMI) (P < 0.001) and high waist circumference (P = 0.016) were inversely associated with sleep quality. Serum concentration of very-low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) (P = 0.004) and triglyceride (P = 0.001) were statistically higher in participants with lower sleep quality than with those with higher sleep quality. The group with a good sleep quality had a higher serum high density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-c) than those with a poor sleep quality (P = 0.034). Being female increased the risk of poor sleep quality by 2.5 folds, and with increasing BMI (OR = 1.17) and serum triglyceride (OR = 1.02) the risk of poor sleep quality was increased.

Conclusions

People with a poor sleep quality had a higher BMI, waist circumference and serum triglyceride levels and a lower HDL-c concentration. Furthermore, BMI and serum triglyceride concentration are independently associated with the score of sleep quality. Indeed, it is recommended for people to screen for sleep quality to start necessary interventions.

Background

Several studies have shown that sleep disorders may lead to metabolic or endocrine changes including insulin resistance, diabetes, obesity, cardiovascular disease and stroke.

Objectives

The aim of this study was to investigate the association between sleep quality and metabolic factors and anthropometric measurements among personnel of a central petrochemical company in Tehran.

Methods

This cross-sectional study was conducted on 400 personnel of a central petrochemical company in Tehran, during year 2015. Demographic information including age, gender, educational status, employment duration, working hours per day, marital status, smoking, medical history for disease and drug use, were collected by a questionnaire. Systolic and diastolic blood pressure and also height and weight were measured by standard methods and body mass index (BMI) was calculated. Pittsburg sleep quality index (PSQI) was performed to assess participants’ sleep quality. Serum concentrations of fasting glucose and lipid profiles were measured by the related biochemical kits. Logistic regression analysis was used for multivariate adjusting of factors associated with sleep quality.

Results

The mean score for participants’ Pittsburgh sleep quality index (PSQI) was 4.77 ± 2.62. About 30% of participants had had bad sleep quality. A high body mass index (BMI) (P < 0.001) and high waist circumference (P = 0.016) were inversely associated with sleep quality. Serum concentration of very-low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) (P = 0.004) and triglyceride (P = 0.001) were statistically higher in participants with lower sleep quality than with those with higher sleep quality. The group with a good sleep quality had a higher serum high density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-c) than those with a poor sleep quality (P = 0.034). Being female increased the risk of poor sleep quality by 2.5 folds, and with increasing BMI (OR = 1.17) and serum triglyceride (OR = 1.02) the risk of poor sleep quality was increased.

Sleep Quality;Lipid Profile;Serum Glucose;Body Mass Index;Insulin Resistance;Petrochemical Company Sleep Quality;Lipid Profile;Serum Glucose;Body Mass Index;Insulin Resistance;Petrochemical Company http://www.Biotech-health.com/index.php?page=article&article_id=38652 Maryam Khorasani Maryam Khorasani Department of Nutrition, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, IR Iran Department of Nutrition, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, IR Iran Asghar Mohammadpoorasl Asghar Mohammadpoorasl Tabriz Health Services Management Research Center, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, IR Iran; Tabriz Health Services Management Research Center, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, IR Iran Tabriz Health Services Management Research Center, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, IR Iran; Tabriz Health Services Management Research Center, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, IR Iran Maryam Javadi Maryam Javadi Department of Nutrition, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, IR Iran; Children Growth Research Center, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, IR Iran Department of Nutrition, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, IR Iran; Children Growth Research Center, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, IR Iran
en 10.17795/bhs-38762 Synergistic Antiparkinsonian Effect of Flunarizine, Glibenclamide and B Vitamins in a Rat 6-Hydroxydopamine Model; The Role of Malondialdehyde Synergistic Antiparkinsonian Effect of Flunarizine, Glibenclamide and B Vitamins in a Rat 6-Hydroxydopamine Model; The Role of Malondialdehyde research-article research-article Conclusions

Since the severity of the behavioral symptoms in the 6-OHDA-induced model of Parkinson disease reflects the degree of the lesion in substantia nigra (SN) dopaminergic neurons, it is suggested that using the combination had neuroprotective effects. The obtained data suggest a synergistic neuroprotective and antiparkinsonian effect for flu, Glib and B com. At least, a part of this effect was mediated through inhibition of oxidative stress.

Results

Pretreatment with a combination of flu, Glib and B com ameliorated the behavioral symptoms of Parkinson disease. The effect of the combination was significantly more potent than those of flu, Glib or B com, solely. Pretreatment with the combination or using only Glib or B com separately, reduced the level of MDA in blood and brain, significantly. However, the effect of the combination was significantly more potent than those of Glib or B com, solely.

Methods

6-OHDA was injected into striatum of rats by stereotaxic surgery. Pretreatment with flu, Glib and B com was started before the surgery and continued to three weeks after the surgery. Development and severity of Parkinson disease were evaluated by the conventional behavioral tests. MDA values were measured spectrophotometrically, using thiobarbituric acid test and the MDA standard curve.

Background

The current study evaluated the effects of a combination of flunarizine (flu) a calcium channel blocker, glibenclamide (Glib), a KATP channels blocker and B vitamins (B com) on the behavioral symptoms of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced model of Parkinson disease to examine the synergistic antiparkinsonian effects of the drugs and supplements. Also the level of malondialdehyde (MDA) was measured in blood and brain suspensions to find probable neuroprotective mechanism of these materials.

Conclusions

Since the severity of the behavioral symptoms in the 6-OHDA-induced model of Parkinson disease reflects the degree of the lesion in substantia nigra (SN) dopaminergic neurons, it is suggested that using the combination had neuroprotective effects. The obtained data suggest a synergistic neuroprotective and antiparkinsonian effect for flu, Glib and B com. At least, a part of this effect was mediated through inhibition of oxidative stress.

Results

Pretreatment with a combination of flu, Glib and B com ameliorated the behavioral symptoms of Parkinson disease. The effect of the combination was significantly more potent than those of flu, Glib or B com, solely. Pretreatment with the combination or using only Glib or B com separately, reduced the level of MDA in blood and brain, significantly. However, the effect of the combination was significantly more potent than those of Glib or B com, solely.

Methods

6-OHDA was injected into striatum of rats by stereotaxic surgery. Pretreatment with flu, Glib and B com was started before the surgery and continued to three weeks after the surgery. Development and severity of Parkinson disease were evaluated by the conventional behavioral tests. MDA values were measured spectrophotometrically, using thiobarbituric acid test and the MDA standard curve.

Background

The current study evaluated the effects of a combination of flunarizine (flu) a calcium channel blocker, glibenclamide (Glib), a KATP channels blocker and B vitamins (B com) on the behavioral symptoms of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced model of Parkinson disease to examine the synergistic antiparkinsonian effects of the drugs and supplements. Also the level of malondialdehyde (MDA) was measured in blood and brain suspensions to find probable neuroprotective mechanism of these materials.

6-Hydroxydopamine;Flunarizine;Glibenclamide: B Vitamins;Behavioral Symptoms;Malondialdehyde 6-Hydroxydopamine;Flunarizine;Glibenclamide: B Vitamins;Behavioral Symptoms;Malondialdehyde http://www.Biotech-health.com/index.php?page=article&article_id=38762 Mohammad Reza Sarookhani Mohammad Reza Sarookhani Paramedical Faculty, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, IR Iran Paramedical Faculty, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, IR Iran Hashem Haghdoost-Yazdi Hashem Haghdoost-Yazdi Healthful Products Research Center, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, IR Iran; Healthful Products Research Center, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, IR Iran. Tel: +98-2813366001, Fax: +98-2813324970-1 Healthful Products Research Center, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, IR Iran; Healthful Products Research Center, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, IR Iran. Tel: +98-2813366001, Fax: +98-2813324970-1 Hossein Piri Hossein Piri Cellular and Molecular Research Center, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, IR Iran Cellular and Molecular Research Center, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, IR Iran Nafiseh Rastgoo Nafiseh Rastgoo Student Research Committee, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, IR Iran Student Research Committee, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, IR Iran Parham Tadayon Parham Tadayon Student Research Committee, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, IR Iran Student Research Committee, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, IR Iran
en 10.17795/bhs-39599 Prevalence of Ureaplasma urealyticum in Endocervical Specimens of Female Patients in Qazvin, Iran Prevalence of <italic>Ureaplasma urealyticum</italic> in Endocervical Specimens of Female Patients in Qazvin, Iran research-article research-article Results

Out of 232 tested samples, 87 cases (37.5%) were positive for U. urealyticum and 145 (62.5%) were negative.

Conclusions

Rapid laboratory detection of genital Ureaplasma in pregnant females is very important, mainly because of the ability of the bacteria to colonize the endocervical lining and cause injury to the fetus

Background

Ureaplasma urealyticum that is the smallest free-living bacterium does not have bacterial cell wall. These organisms cause different infections in respiratory and urinary tract system in close contact with epithelial cells. The current study aimed to determine the prevalence of U. urealyticum in endocervical samples of female patients referred to Kowsar hospital in Qazvin, Iran.

Methods

The study was conducted on 232 married females aged 20 - 50 years. According to a gynecologist’s request, genital tract biopsies were taken from each individual using Dacron swabs. Each swab was placed into 4 mL of the pleural pneumonia-like organism (PPLO) broth media. Then 25 μL of the suspension was inoculated on the surface of PPLO agar. The remaining broth media and agar plates were incubated at 35°C in 5% CO2 atmosphere.

Results

Out of 232 tested samples, 87 cases (37.5%) were positive for U. urealyticum and 145 (62.5%) were negative.

Conclusions

Rapid laboratory detection of genital Ureaplasma in pregnant females is very important, mainly because of the ability of the bacteria to colonize the endocervical lining and cause injury to the fetus

Background

Ureaplasma urealyticum that is the smallest free-living bacterium does not have bacterial cell wall. These organisms cause different infections in respiratory and urinary tract system in close contact with epithelial cells. The current study aimed to determine the prevalence of U. urealyticum in endocervical samples of female patients referred to Kowsar hospital in Qazvin, Iran.

Methods

The study was conducted on 232 married females aged 20 - 50 years. According to a gynecologist’s request, genital tract biopsies were taken from each individual using Dacron swabs. Each swab was placed into 4 mL of the pleural pneumonia-like organism (PPLO) broth media. Then 25 μL of the suspension was inoculated on the surface of PPLO agar. The remaining broth media and agar plates were incubated at 35°C in 5% CO2 atmosphere.

Ureaplasma urealyticum;Endocervical;Prevalence Ureaplasma urealyticum;Endocervical;Prevalence http://www.Biotech-health.com/index.php?page=article&article_id=39599 Hamid Bahrami Hamid Bahrami School of Medicine, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, Iran School of Medicine, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, Iran Taghi Naserpour Farivar Taghi Naserpour Farivar Cellular and Molecular Research Center, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, Iran; Cellular and Molecular Research Center, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Bahonar Blvd., Qazvin, Iran Cellular and Molecular Research Center, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, Iran; Cellular and Molecular Research Center, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Bahonar Blvd., Qazvin, Iran Masoumeh Aslanimehr Masoumeh Aslanimehr School of Medicine, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, Iran School of Medicine, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, Iran Amir Peymani Amir Peymani Medical Microbiology Research Center, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, Iran Medical Microbiology Research Center, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, Iran Talat Dabaghi Ghaleh Talat Dabaghi Ghaleh School of Medicine, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, Iran School of Medicine, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, Iran Hassan Jahani Hashemi Hassan Jahani Hashemi School of Medicine, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, Iran School of Medicine, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, Iran Saman Saadat Saman Saadat School of Medicine, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, Iran School of Medicine, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, Iran
en 10.17795/bhs-40735 The Relationship between Occupational Noise Exposure and Noise Induced Hearing Loss (NIHL) in Small-Scale Industries: A Case Study in the City of Damavand, Iran The Relationship between Occupational Noise Exposure and Noise Induced Hearing Loss (NIHL) in Small-Scale Industries: A Case Study in the City of Damavand, Iran research-article research-article Background

Exposure to the excessive levels of occupational noise is one of the principal harmful agents affecting the workers’ health. This study aimed to investigate the relationship between the occupational noise exposure and the hearing loss caused by working in small-scale service industries in the city of Damavand, close to the metropolitan capital city of Tehran, Iran.

Methods

This descriptive cross-sectional study investigated the occupational noise levels within the 90 small-scale industries (mainly service industries and workshops) working under the supervision of Damavand healthcare network governed by the Iranian ministry of health and medical education. A sound level meter (Bruel and Kjær 2250) was employed to determine the noise exposure levels based on the dB A, and according to the standard ISO 9612: 2009. The audiometric exam tests were performed by an audiometer (model MEVOX SA-900). The obtained data were then analysed by SPSS 16, using linear regression and t-test.

Conclusions

The 8-hour Leqs and work experience were, respectively, the most important factors affecting the rate of hearing loss among the participants of this study.

Results

The highest measured 8-hour equivalent continuous sound pressure levels (Leqs) were associated with auto body mechanics (89.2 dB A), foundry and casting workers (88.8 dB A), aluminium products fabrication workers (86.32 dB A), blacksmiths and forging (85.8 dB A) carpenters (84.93 dB A), and cabinet manufacturers, respectively (84 dB A). Results from the hearing threshold shifts of the workers from the studied occupational groups revealed that the highest work-related hearing loss associated with the right ear occurred among the auto body mechanics, aluminium products fabrication workers and carpenters. However, the most significant work-related hearing loss associated with the left ear was noticed among carpenters, aluminium products fabrication workers, and auto body mechanics, respectively. Pearson correlation coefficient was tested between Leqs, work experience and hearing loss, and the results implied that the progress of workers’ hearing loss was correlated with the increase in work history and experience.

Background

Exposure to the excessive levels of occupational noise is one of the principal harmful agents affecting the workers’ health. This study aimed to investigate the relationship between the occupational noise exposure and the hearing loss caused by working in small-scale service industries in the city of Damavand, close to the metropolitan capital city of Tehran, Iran.

Methods

This descriptive cross-sectional study investigated the occupational noise levels within the 90 small-scale industries (mainly service industries and workshops) working under the supervision of Damavand healthcare network governed by the Iranian ministry of health and medical education. A sound level meter (Bruel and Kjær 2250) was employed to determine the noise exposure levels based on the dB A, and according to the standard ISO 9612: 2009. The audiometric exam tests were performed by an audiometer (model MEVOX SA-900). The obtained data were then analysed by SPSS 16, using linear regression and t-test.

Conclusions

The 8-hour Leqs and work experience were, respectively, the most important factors affecting the rate of hearing loss among the participants of this study.

Results

The highest measured 8-hour equivalent continuous sound pressure levels (Leqs) were associated with auto body mechanics (89.2 dB A), foundry and casting workers (88.8 dB A), aluminium products fabrication workers (86.32 dB A), blacksmiths and forging (85.8 dB A) carpenters (84.93 dB A), and cabinet manufacturers, respectively (84 dB A). Results from the hearing threshold shifts of the workers from the studied occupational groups revealed that the highest work-related hearing loss associated with the right ear occurred among the auto body mechanics, aluminium products fabrication workers and carpenters. However, the most significant work-related hearing loss associated with the left ear was noticed among carpenters, aluminium products fabrication workers, and auto body mechanics, respectively. Pearson correlation coefficient was tested between Leqs, work experience and hearing loss, and the results implied that the progress of workers’ hearing loss was correlated with the increase in work history and experience.

Noise-Induced Hearing Loss;Sound Pressure Level;Small-Scale Industries Noise-Induced Hearing Loss;Sound Pressure Level;Small-Scale Industries http://www.Biotech-health.com/index.php?page=article&article_id=40735 Karim Jabbari Karim Jabbari Occupational Health Department, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran; Occupational Health Department, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran Occupational Health Department, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran; Occupational Health Department, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran Parvin Nassiri Parvin Nassiri Occupational Health Department, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran Occupational Health Department, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran Mohammad Reza Monazzam Esmaeelpour Mohammad Reza Monazzam Esmaeelpour Occupational Health Department, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran Occupational Health Department, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran Kamal Azam Kamal Azam Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran Mohammad Faridan Mohammad Faridan Department of Occupational Health, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran, IR Iran Department of Occupational Health, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran, IR Iran Leila Heidari Leila Heidari Tehran East Health Center, Tehran, IR Iran Tehran East Health Center, Tehran, IR Iran